Saturday, May 03, 2014

Off Canvas Menus with CSS3 Transitions and Transforms

Off Canvas Menus

Off Canvas Menus are used primarily with Mobile and touch devices and can provide an extremely useful and beautiful experience for your users. This tutorial will cover an introduction on them, a getting started guide, some improvement tricks, and then finally some awesome demos for you to build off of. Instead of JavaScript, we'll use CSS3 Transitions and Translations for the animation making them smoother, better performing, and easier to tweak and customize.

Thursday, May 01, 2014

Chrome DevTools Features You May Have Missed

Chrome DevTools

In 2013, I posted a few tutorials on DevTools: Markup and Style, Networking and the Console and JavaScript and Performance, covering the basic features of the various DevTools panels. Since then, a lot has changed, so let's take a look.

Thursday, May 01, 2014

DRY-ing Out Your Sass Mixins

Sass Mixins

One of the most powerful features of the CSS preprocessor Sass is the mixin, an abstraction of a common pattern into a semantic and reusable chunk. Think of taking the styles for a button and, instead of needing to remember what all of the properties are, having a selector include the styles for the button instead. The button styles are maintained in a single place, making them easy to update and keep consistent.

Monday, April 28, 2014

Build a Dribbble Portfolio Grid With Flexboxgrid and Jribbble

Flexboxgrid

Building with a grid has become an everyday requirement for front-end developers. Not only do grids provide a sense of rhythm and consistency in design, but when a well-known grid structure is used it provides a simple collective design language for cross–team work.

Monday, April 28, 2014

12 Little-Known CSS Facts

12 Little-Known CSS Facts

CSS is not an overly complex language. But even if you've been writing CSS for many years, you probably still come across new things — properties you've never used, values you've never considered, or specification details you never knew about.

Saturday, April 26, 2014

Using Media Queries in JavaScript

Using Media Queries in JavaScript

If you practice responsive design then you use a lot of media queries. Media Queries are a CSS feature that gives designers the power to add something like if statements. By this I mean that it allows you to apply rules only if the current page meets certain conditions. In this article I'll show you how I use media queries in JavaScript.

Saturday, April 26, 2014

How to Make Any Website Responsive

How to Make Any Website Responsive

According to Verisign's Domain Name Industry Brief for 2013, it is estimated that 85% of all .com and .net TLDs (top-level domains) have websites: that's over 100 million websites (being that .com and .net domains collectively number over 120 million). Now, that is a lot of websites! So how exactly are we going to make them all responsive?

Saturday, April 26, 2014

Why Element Queries Matter

Element Queries
A sketch of our main component

At work, many of our pages present one or more collection of items, like products, shops, or whatever. It's basically a list of thumbnails, with a title and a location and/or a price. When you click on it, it leads you to the page related to the item. We call this the elements component (we could have called it thumbs-list or something but that doesn't matter).

Saturday, April 26, 2014

How to Create Custom HTML Elements

Custom HTML Elements
Photo by Kenny Louie / Flickr

An exciting feature of the HTML specification that's been getting a bit of hype recently is custom HTML elements. These allow you to create your own HTML elements along with their own JavaScript API. This can be useful when building interfaces with components that are reused throughout an application.

Saturday, April 19, 2014

New HTML5 Attributes for Hyperlinks: download, media, and ping

New HTML5 Attributes for Hyperlinks
Hyperlinks have been around since the dawn of the Web. But with the dawn of HTML5, three new attributes have been added to the humble <a> tag to keep existing attributes like href, rel and others company.

The new attributes are: download, media and ping. In this article, we'll take a quick look at what these new attributes are and how they can be used once browser support improves.

The download Attribute

The download attribute is new in HTML5. It supplements the existing href attribute by telling the browser that the resource the href points to should be downloaded directly, instead of visited (which could happen with a file that the browser can open, like a PDF). The value of the download attribute is used for the name of the file that is downloaded.